Give Your Balance Some Love

We spend most of our lives neglecting it, yet we depend on it for basic functioning. What would these simple tasks be like without balance?

  • Walking
  • Reaching into / up to a shelf or cupboard
  • Dancing
  • Getting up from a bed
  • Sitting down in a chair
  • Going up stairs
  • Playing your favorite game or sport
  • Closing your eyes for a romantic kiss

They all use multiple parts of the systems that make up our balance. So isn’t it time you gave your balance some love to keep it going strong? The nice thing about balance is that it’s not very high maintenance. It doesn’t demand outrageous commitment (unless your need outrageous balance).

For those of you who aren’t into slacklining 3,000 feet above a valley floor, helping your balance can be as simple as adding a couple of exercises to your gym routine. Or standing on one leg while brushing your teeth (obviously don’t do this if you feel it’s too difficult – see our balance training guide).

As well as training the neuromuscular system, exercises like Tai Chi, squats and lunges help with leg strength, which can be a key part of what is missing as people age. Even those who run regularly can benefit from the greater range of movement delivered by these exercises, and from working different sets of muscles.

Download Free Ebook on the Science of Balance

How Trendy is your Workout?

is your fitness on trend

The American College of Sports Medicine releases an annual survey on fitness trends each year. Want to know how trendy you are? Looking for the next cool thing to spice up your exercise commitment? Zibrio took a look at the results on your behalf.

ACSM surveys fitness professionals around the world, and look for trends, not flash-in-the-pan fads that won’t last. They’re designed to help fitness professionals and community centers decide what to invest in for their customers.

#1: Wearables

Up from #3 spot last year, wearables are once again high on everyone’s list. Whether you use them to track what you do, or remind you what to do when, they’re becoming the new standard.

#4: Older Adult Fitness

This has been in the top 10 for the last few years, rising from #9 last year as more people who’ve grown up with the fitness movement grow into the ‘over 50’ category. Baby boomers and the generations before them often have more time to exercise, value group exercise and can take advantage of the quieter times at the gym while younger generations are at work. Thanks to organizations like Silver Sneakers, YMCA, and other big gym franchises, this age group has more variety than ever to choose from: lower impact exercise classes, and balance specific workouts. There are also increasing numbers of personal trainers who are qualified to help mature exercisers with their health goals.

#10: Exercise as Medicine

This phrase is everywhere in 2019, along with its cousin, ‘food as medicine’. The medical establishment is increasingly citing the benefits of exercise, and not just for heart health or to manage weight. Many chronic pain conditions can be improved – or at least the symptoms can be managed – with the right type of exercise. There are even reports from the United Kingdom of doctors prescribing dancing to some patients!

#13: Mobile Apps

As fitness tracking moves to your wrist, apps available for your phone continue to grow in variety and scope: watch videos of how to do a particular exercise, take photos of your own workout, manually add untracked activities to your profile. Their usefulness and improved user interface pushes this trend up from #26 last year.

#16: Outcome Measurements

Possibly the most useful trend of all. If you’re spending all that time, effort and money on the classes and apps and healthy habits, you’d want to know they were working, right? Weight measurement has been around for a while. Now, especially when working with a personal trainer, you can measure a host of other outcomes that show you’re becoming a fitter, better you.

5 Simple Ways to Start The New Year Right

get in balance

Do you make resolutions at the start of a new year? Or do you think they’re just a waste of time (seeing as most people have given up by mid February)?

Or perhaps you’re completely contented with where your life is, in which case, we salute you! But for most of us, there are at least some tweaks we’d like to make, or goals we’d like to chase.

But promising to do something (or give up doing something) for a whole year can be unbelievably daunting. No wonder we fail.

Here at Zibrio, we put our heads together and brainstormed our most successful strategies for making things stick.

  1. Start Small: What can you do today towards your goal? 5 minutes of balance exercises are easy to fit in. Set an alarm to go to bed 10 minutes earlier tonight. Then repeat tomorrow. Soon, you’ll have stuck with your goal for a whole week, then two.
  2. Go Big: Think of something you really want that seems difficult. Running a half marathon, dropping a dress size before your daughter’s wedding. Imagine your feeling of triumph should you achieve it, think about it in great detail. Then break it down into weekly achievements. Get going on week one today.
  3. Be Accountable: It doesn’t matter if you’re using an app to count steps or sleep, or whether you put notches in your bedpost, but count the days you succeed in your new habit. It can be immensely motivating to look back after a month and see what you’ve managed to achieve.
  4. Reward Yourself: Yes, this can be as simple as bribing yourself with a new pair of shoes / going to the movies / having a slice of cake. Put it on a planner so that when you achieve the goal it belongs to, the reward feels justified. Set small rewards for early on, then space them out a bit to keep them feeling satisfying.
  5. Be Kind: Some days won’t go as planned. You’ll have a bad night’s sleep, or catch a cold. #life’snotperfect. Let it go. Think of one positive thing you can do that’s aligned with your goal, even if it’s not your goal. For example, if you don’t have time for that longer sleep, take 5 minutes for some mindfulness meditation to help you recharge. Then get back to the habit tomorrow.

As always, if you’re making a big change in your health behaviours, it’s a good idea talking it over with your doctor first. She or he can help point you towards resources, as well as help you make sure you’re not putting yourself at risk for injury.

Like what you see here? You can sign up here for a monthly summary of our articles on healthy living, and we’ll send you a free ebook on balance as a thank you.

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Holiday Balance Tips

have your cake and eat it

The holidays should be a time for celebration with family and friends, but often, in the endless round of preparation, shopping and parties, one of the first things to be sacrificed are the habits that keep us healthy.

But you don’t have to sacrifice your balance – or your health, if you keep in mind some simple tricks:

  1. Small actions help. Give yourself 5-10 minutes in the morning to do some light exercise: yoga stretches, Tai Chi sequences, anything that fires the connection between brain and muscles. If you don’t have time in the morning, fit it in later in the day.
  2. Use the dead time. When brushing your teeth, or waiting in line at the store, practise standing on one leg, the other raised just off the floor. Make sure there is something sturdy nearby to keep you safe should you need it.
  3. Keep moving. You don’t even need your workout clothes. Take every opportunity to get up and move around, or choose to stand instead of sit, and walk instead of drive wherever possible.
  4. Drink water. Dehydration adds to fatigue, which is bad for balance. We don’t feel as thirsty in the colder weather, so make a point of drinking water often. Added bonus: nutritionists recommend starting every party with a glass of water to cut down on the empty calories.
  5. Protect your sleep. Set an alarm if necessary, and get to bed in time to get a full night’s rest. But don’t beat yourself up if you can’t avoid some late nights. Enjoy them! and try to give yourself some extra rest the following day. Even a 5-10 minute period of meditation or mindfulness can help soothe a tired nervous system and combat holiday stress.

For further information on the many influences on your balance and how to help them, check out our:

Free ebook

 

Wishing you a better balanced holiday season this year.

Signs Your Balance Needs Attention

what you give up without balance

At a health fair recently, we asked people to complete the following sentence:

If I had good balance, I’d be able to …

Stop there a moment. What would you like to do, or learn to do, if you were confident in your balance?

Some answers were not so surprising. Travel came up a lot. Some people talked about fears of walking outside on wet, leafy or icy sidewalks. Others wanted to visit friends at the other end of the country or go hiking in a National Park.

A woman in her 70’s told a story of visiting family who were extending their house, adding a floor. She happily walked up the rough steps to take a look and only noticed the lack of handrail (or anything sturdy) when she turned to come back down again.

“Until you push yourself into doing something different, you don’t know you have a problem”

A man in his late 60’s was more concerned with everyday inconveniences:

“Be able to put on my pants standing up”

Which got us thinking. When we’re comfortable in our routines, we don’t push the limits. It’s easy to put it off till tomorrow (and the day after). Until walking unsupported down stairs feels dangerous, and then even simpler, everyday things like dressing, have to be modified.

It doesn’t have to be that way though. There are some simple balance specific exercises to help with overall balance – click here to read them. And when it comes to quad strength (the muscles at the front of the thigh), the Center for Disease Control recommends the following exercise, which has a positive effect on balance:

Chair Sit to Stand

  1. Start sitting on a dining room chair (or similar firm chair)
  2. Place your feet flat on the floor
  3. Stand without using your arms to push up
  4. If you need to use your arms, try to use them as little as possible, and work towards not using them at all
  5. Take a moment to breathe and steady yourself while standing
  6. Sit back down slowly (don’t flop into the chair, control your movement)
  7. Repeat 10-15 times
  8. If you can’t do 10 to start with, do as many as you can and then rest. Try to do one more the next day

If you suffer from dizziness or light headedness when standing, this is not a recommended exercise. As with all exercise, you should speak with your doctor first before exerting yourself, and use common sense about what is safe for you to accomplish.

Think about your routine. What do you not do anymore that you’d like to? What steps can you put in place to make it possible again? It’s interesting how often better balance can be the key to the problem.

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Meet the Ambassador: Trainer Ellen Rodriguez

We’re delighted to introduce marathon runner and personal trainer Ellen Rodriguez as a Zibrio Balance Ambassador.

Ellen’s passion is to understand her clients’ goals and current status, so that she can customize workouts and more to help them succeed, and surpass those goals.

A long-time runner, Ellen completed various marathons and ultra marathons in the 1990’s. In 1996 she was part of a Houston Area Road Runners Association women’s team who established a Guinness World Record for the 100 x 1 mile relay.  In 2000, she switched focus to 5k and 10k distances, and after training from the legendary Tom Tellez (University of Houston and Carl Lewis’ coach), she started winning age group awards (though she won’t say which age groups!). Since 2011 she has been running with Power in Motion (affiliated with HARRA).

Her long-time friend, Carl Lewis (Olympic champion and author of One More Victory Lap (1996), she began organized strength training and used a personal trainer for the first time. It was a turning point that decided her to help other runners improve their performance.

She became a certified personal trainer herself with ACE (American Council on Exercise), and P.F.I.T. in association with the American College of Integrative  Medicine. She also holds certifications for:

  • Pilates Mat Instructor (Powerhous Pilates)
  • Sports Conditioning Specialist (International  Fitness Professionals Association (IFPA))
  • Golf Conditioning Specialist (IFPA)
  • Aquatic Exercise Association Member
  • IDEA Health and Fitness Association Member

Her own workouts include running, bicycle spinning, strength training and pilates. You may even see her at the Memorial Park Golf driving range. One of her proudest achievements is to be a lifetime member of Weight Watchers. She says “It’s one of the easiest programs to follow and it worked well for me.”

Find Ellen at Houston Inner Loop Trainer, and at 550 Westcott St, Suite 340, Houston, Tx 77007

Why Balance is Like Flossing

teeth in balance

You’re lying in the dentist’s chair and he or she asks whether you floss regularly. You nod, and avoid their eyes. Because you know they can see, from the plaque on your teeth, that ‘regularly’ is stretching the truth a bit. You own floss, you do use it – especially after eating ribs or corn – but not exactly every day.

So it is with most of our health. We know what we should be doing, but unless someone is holding up a mirror to us, or displaying pounds on a scale, we sometimes gloss over the truth to ourselves.

Balance is in many ways a holistic measure of a person’s health and fitness. So if you exercise regularly, and challenge your muscles and your balance, it will improve. If you have a period of time where you’re just going through the motions, or skipping the difficult exercises, your balance will deteriorate over time.

Like flossing, you really can’t fake it.

The good news is that, unlike flossing, you can take up balance exercises at any point and start to see improvements within a short period of time. How quickly will depend on a number of factors, including your general fitness and how hard you work at it. There is no quick fix: only by doing will your balance improve.

What should I do?

If you’ve been neglecting balance – or never worked specifically on balance before, it’s worth talking to a personal trainer or instructor who can help assess where you are and how best to move forwards. If you like the social element of group exercise classes, look for Tai Chi or beginner’s yoga near you. The instructor will help you form the poses correctly to maximize benefit and minimize risk of injury.

Even if you’re a regular exerciser or sportsperson, it’s worth checking that you’ve not fallen into a rut with your training. Adding balance training into your workout can help avoid injury and overtraining too.

Free ebook on balance

Click the link above to receive a free ebook on balance and how it works in the body.

Free Balance Screening

secret to better balance

This Fall, the Zibrio team will be running free balance events at various locations in the Houston, Tx, area.

If you’ve always wanted to know how to measure your balance, or understand the factors which affect your balance , come along to one of the following locations.

Simply stand on the smart Zibrio scale for 1 minute. You’ll receive your unique balance score – a snapshot of how you’re balancing today – as well as personalized insights into how to improve it.

We look forward to meeting you!

Bayland Community Center: 18 September 2018 @ 9.15am
Tracy Gee Community Center: 19 September 2018 @ 8.30 am
Houstonian Club22 September 2018 @10 am
Trini Mendenhall Community Center26 September 2018 @ 9.00am
Starbucks, Augusta Drive: 9 October 2018 @ 9.30 am
Trotter YMCA, Augusta Drive: 31 October 2018 @ 10.30 am

For further information, contact us, or one of the centers directly.

How To Protect Your Vacation And Come Home Injury-Free

protect balance on vacation

The danger that no-one is talking about.

The internet is full of helpful articles warning people of the higher risk of car accidents in the summer months, or of how to protect ourselves from food poisioning while on vacation. A few sites even tackle the dangers in taking up an adventure sport like windsurfing – or even jet skiing – without proper preparation or training.

But there is something fundemental to everything we do – whether on vacation or not – that no-one is talking about. It’s so important yet for most of our lives we go about doing it unconsciously.

But it can still ruin the entire holiday if we neglect it.

The ability to balance, and the risk of falling, are not just issues for the very young or very old.

Aside from frailty, two of the biggest impacts on our balance are from fatigue and lack of attention. When we travel, we have to deal with fatigue: from jet lag to sleeping in unfamiliar surroundings, being too hot or too cold, staying out later, becoming dehydrated, or simply becoming tired by all the sights and sounds of the new location.

When we’re out of our habitual surroundings, there is a lot more for our brains to notice, process and understand. And it doesn’t have to be as difficult as making yourself understood in a foreign language. Navigating an unfamiliar city in your home country also requires more effort from your brain.

All of that is tiring. And when we are tired, not only are our reaction times (to the uneven pavement, for example) slower, but the vigor of our response is also lower, making it more likely that a stumble will result in a fall all the way to the ground.

At home, in familiar surroundings, we can pay more attention to where we walk, how fast we turn around, and thereby mitigate the risk of a fall on days when we feel weak or tired. But on vacation, the chances are that, even while tired, we need to use our attention to help us find our way in the new location, to understand that different accent, to absorb the new sights and sounds. We don’t want to miss out. And so we are doubly vulnerable.

Help protect your vacation and come home injury free:

  • Plan for time to catch up on sleep while away
  • If you’re crossing time zones, remember it takes about a day to normalize for every hour of time zone
  • Give your fitness a boost by exercising before you go away, and plan to keep doing something while away – walking, using the hotel gym
  • If you take medications, try not to start a new one just before going away. And make sure you take them in your hand luggage as changing the dose either up or down can impact your balance (not to mention your health!)

Why You Shouldn’t Wish For a Balance Pill

sharon-mccutcheon-530237-unsplash

Are you frustrated that there’s no pill for balance?

Wishing you could just drink the elixir of balance and go back to what you were doing? But stop and think about it for a minute, it’s actually much better this way.

If you could pop a pill to cure your balance, you’d become dependent on that pill. And anxious if it begins to run out, or becomes more expensive. But if you get hold of the tools to improve your balance, you not only “cure” your wobbliness, you give yourself true Independence too.

Tools? You say. There’s a tool for balance?

One of those stability balls I see in my gym? Well, yes, that’s one of them. But once you use the tool, how do you know it’s making a difference? Unless you’re constantly falling over, it’s hard to know when your balance is bad. And how to judge if it’s getting slightly better or slightly worse?

You could book yourself in for a comprehensive balance assessment with a physical therapist. If you’re able to, you could time yourself standing on one leg (we don’t recommend this unless you’re very confident you can do it safely). Both of these would give you one data point, for how you’re balancing today (physical therapy would also give you a personal plan for improvement). Balance fluctuates, like blood pressure does, like your weight does, and the greatest value lies in tracking it regularly. Then you’ll know when you’re making good use of the tools available, when you’re making progress.

Knowing where you are on the journey makes it more fun, and motivates you to keep going. So stop wishing for a magic pill and grab your independence for yourself.

Grab my independence!  keep me inspired, and let me be the first to know when the Zibrio tracking scale is available